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Requirements

I Don’t Like to Write

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DoNotWrite[1]

By Erik Jul

A colleague of mine once said, “I don’t like to write, but I love having written.”

And so, with a deft change of tense, the author had leaped over the pain of writing to the future perfect satisfaction of having written.

Some business leaders or software developers are like my friend and do not like to write functional requirements.

Do not like to write may mean:

  • Do not want to take the time
  • Do to want to spend the money
  • Do not think it is necessary
  • Do not know how to write a good functional requirement

Rarely would a business sponsor approve a project without requiring requirements. All too often, however, even with good intentions, the requirements produced look as though the author(s) did not like to write.

The requirements lack fundamental qualities of correctness, completeness, clarity, concision, and consensus (among others).

I don’t like to write, either, if poor requirements result.

My safeguard against poorly written requirements includes using the fundamental Rapid JAD principles:

When practiced routinely, these methods greatly assist my writing process and I produce better requirements. By capturing findings during Rapid JAD sessions, I am more likely to snare the essence of a discussion.  By documenting once, I create a single source of truth accessible to others, and by making these processes visible to all, I rapidly gain and confirm consensus.  Finally, by revising quickly, I am able to refine requirement statements as needed to ensure that they are in good order.

I might not like to write, too, if I did not use Rapid JAD techniques.

But as it is, with Rapid JAD, I love writing (requirements) and I love having written!

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